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  • 1
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 60 (1993) 107-118
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 1993
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 60 (1993) 107-118
    Keywords: Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Ugaritic language ; Ugaritic literature ; Gods History To 333 B.C.
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  • 2
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 60 (1993) 45-68
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 1993
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 60 (1993) 45-68
    Keywords: Bible Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; History
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  • 3
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 47 (1990) 89-102
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 1990
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 47 (1990) 89-102
    Keywords: Bible Criticism, Form ; Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible as literature
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  • 4
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 47 (1990) 33-50
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 1990
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 47 (1990) 33-50
    Keywords: Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.
    Note: Appeared also in "The Poetical Books; a Sheffield Reader", 1997.
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  • 5
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 47 (1990) 15-31
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 1990
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 47 (1990) 15-31
    Keywords: Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.
    Abstract: Analyzes the biblical story of Esther as a literary work whose narrative hangs on ironic reversals. The ironies represent a model for Jewish survival in the diaspora and the writer's fundamentally ironic view of Jewish-Gentile relations. The potential genocide of the powerless Jews of the Persian Empire is contrasted with the actual survival of the powerful Jews of the Persian court - Esther and Mordekhai. Discusses the ironies in the story, the ethical issues of the Jews' massacre of the Persians (who were not committed Jew-haters) and Jewish self-criticism, and themes of Jewish self-defense and Jewish-Gentile relations. Contends that the text postulates the possibility of surviving in the diaspora with dual loyalties and with the ambivalent feelings of Jewish solidarity and self-criticism - assimilation and Jewish identification.
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  • 6
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2020
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 44,3 (2020)
    Keywords: Rashi, ; Bible Criticism, interpretation, etc., Jewish Middle Ages, 600-1500 ; History ; Bible Hermeneutics
    Abstract: Rashi is well recognized for his exegetical innovation of the peshat approach. He appears to claim to focus on peshat, but his reliance on the midrash is undeniable. In an attempt to better understand this problem, rather than focus simply on his definition of peshat, I suggest directing attention to the readerly involvement in constructing what is plain. Among the elements that are commonly thought to construct plain sense, I stress the variables inherent in the notion of context. To set the scope of a text constitutes a basis for what feels plain. If so, the disparity between Rashi’s peshat and the modern plain sense may be put in terms of the divergent scope of text set in action. I also suggest the gradual development of peshat can be situated in the broader cultural movement in 11th- and 12th-century Europe in which literate culture began to emerge.
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  • 7
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 44,3 (2020) 437-455
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2020
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 44,3 (2020) 437-455
    Keywords: Bible Language, style ; Hebrew language, Biblical Interrogative ; Rhetoric in the Bible
    Abstract: The interrogative sequence אִם‎ . . . הֲ‎ in Biblical Hebrew can be employed in two forms of disjunctive question. The first offers mutually exclusive questions and the second comprises a rhetorical pair. Close examination of the extant examples reveals no difficulty in distinguishing between these two forms and, further, that, when employed to express a rhetorical question, the double rhetorical sequence אִם‎ . . . הֲ‎ anticipates the answer ‘No’. Careful study of a debated example, Jer. 31.20, confirms that a negative answer is implied here, hence the evidence strongly favours this reading in the other contentious passage, Hab. 3.8. Here, triple rhetorical questions introduced by the interrogative particles אִם‎ . . . אִם‎ . . . הֲ‎ are employed in a motivated interrogative sentence, suggesting that a negative answer is therefore expected.
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  • 8
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 44,3 (2020) 420-436
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2020
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 44,3 (2020) 420-436
    Keywords: Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Idolatry Biblical teaching
    Abstract: This article presents a comparative reading of Micah 5.9-14 [10-15] and Isaiah 2.6-22. The article demonstrates the contribution of comparative reading to the understanding of each text. The discussion opens by outlining the clear lexical and thematic similarities between the units. While some of the similarities have been previously noted by scholars, this article expands on the range of verses analyzed and method of presenting similarities, for a more accurate picture. Based on the similarities between the units, the discussion turns to the lexical, structural, and content differences between them. Finally, this analysis of similarities and differences is a tool for uncovering essential ideological differences between the texts. The literary and ideological study in this article reveals the worldviews expressed in the units, such as the attitude toward idolatry, the God of Israel, and other gods.
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  • 9
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2020
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 44,3 (2020) 394-419
    Keywords: Beck, Gad, ; Ehud ; Jael ; Bible. Comparative studies ; Bible Gay interpretations
    Abstract: Scholars typically describe the book of Judges as encompassing a cyclical transgress–suffer–prosper–transgress–again trope. Although Israelite peace and autonomy are maintained at various moments throughout the text, hardship inevitably ensues, leading exegetes to focus on the Israelites’ repeated demise as opposed to their continual triumphs. As David Gunn notes, ‘reward and punishment is often viewed as the book’s dominant theme’. Or, in the words of Danna Nolan Fewell, the stories within Judges are frequently read as a collective ‘downward spiral for Israel and its leaders’. I question, however, whether such thematic analysis might prove insufficient when engaging a hermeneutic of trauma and survival—or queer survivance, as we will see. Interestingly, of the 400-year period covered in the book of Judges, only 111 of them are spent in subjugation. Nearly three-fourths of the time period covered by the book, in other words, recounts times of judgeship and autonomy. Might this story be less about cultural transgression and more about the creative ways in which the Israelites managed to endure? In this article, I will provide an intertextual comparison of the Judges cycle with the memoir of Holocaust survivor, Gad Beck. In doing so, I will suggest that Judges offers us a literary representation of an ancient culture’s fight to persist. Rather than guide readers through the entirety of the Judges narrative, however, I will focus on Judges 3 and 4, as the stories of and events surrounding Ehud and Jael offer a more concentrated instance of the aforementioned cyclical trope. From a stance of hetero-suspicion and with a theoretical view to intertextuality and queer survivance, I will argue that, like Beck, Ehud and Jael subvert oppressive power structures through gender-bending performances and the embodiment of ambivalent, and even comedic, identity markers. Taking such similarities into consideration, I will then suggest that Ehud’s and Jael’s queer-comic consciousness becomes another thematic trope within the book of Judges as a whole. Yet instead of focusing on the repetition of the Israelites’ self-fulfilling demise, this trope spotlights the creative ways in which the Judges narrative becomes one of survival and reflects an ancient culture’s will to resist, persist, and indeed, live.
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  • 10
    Article
    Article
    In:  Journal for the Study of the Old Testament 44,3 (2020) 456-471
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2020
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the Old Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 44,3 (2020) 456-471
    Keywords: Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible. Language, style ; Creation Biblical teaching
    Abstract: The end of the first section of the whirlwind speech in Job 38.37b–38 reads, ‘who can tilt the waterskins of the heavens, when the dust runs into a mass and the clods stick fast together?’ (ESV). The straightforward explanation, that this refers to rainfall, cannot explain the verses in the larger context of the chapter. This article carefully reviews the words used in v. 38, in particular עפר‎ ‘dust’ and יצק‎ ‘to pour’ (here ‘to run’), and points to a parallel for דבק‎ ‘stick together’ in Job 41.15. This newly collected evidence reinforces the hypothesis of Van Wolde, that the stanza is a reference to the creation of the earth. With the suggested interpretation, the poetic structure of chapter 38 is more coherent. However, for this to work, one must either swap vv. 36 and 37 or reorder 36–38 into two tricola instead of three bicola.
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