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  • 1
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2021
    Titel der Quelle: Novum Testamentum
    Angaben zur Quelle: 64,1 (2022) 36-53
    Keywords: New Testament. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Jews Restoration Early church, ca. 30-600 ; History of doctrines ; Greek language, Biblical Terms and phrases ; Eschatology New Testament teaching
    Abstract: The word σκηνοποιός (Acts 18:3), a hapax legomenon, has been the subject of intense scrutiny because it may disclose the socio-economic nature of Paul’s trade. However, attempts to reconstruct historically his trade have not confidently identified its accurate historical reference. Since this difficulty derives from Luke’s choice of vocabulary—he uses a word that is very rare in the canon of Greco-Roman literature—this study attends to the word’s rhetorical setting that may explain Luke’s lexical choice. This choice would enhance the word’s symbolic value although weakening its referential value. Σκηνοποιός is plausibly an instance of Lukan etymological wordplay that draws on the continued symbolism of σκηνή in Luke-Acts—a term that captures Luke’s restoration eschatology.
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  • 2
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2020
    Titel der Quelle: Journal for the Study of the New Testament
    Angaben zur Quelle: 43,2 (2020) 194-213
    Keywords: Jesus Trial ; New Testament. Relation to the Bible ; New Testament. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.
    Abstract: Whereas scholars’ methodological assumptions about NT texts’ evocation of Israel’s scripture vary, the plausibility and significance of multivalent allusions need to be examined. The ecce homo statement in the Pilate trial (Jn 19.5) is an apt case for this examination. This study exercises a literary analysis of both proposed allusions – to Zech. 6.12 and 1 Sam. 9.17 – and shows that they are based on a common deeper structure despite the difference in phraseological conformity and historical and literary settings. This deeper structure, functioning like a masterplot, has a simple story form of God’s kingship that consists of his contention with dishonoring hostility and the subsequent building of his temple/dwelling place. This story form, captured in the Song of Moses (Exod. 15) and undergirding the Zechariah sign-act (6.9-15) and Saul’s kingship establishment story (1 Sam. 9), reveals that even in the trial scene Jesus is paradoxically enthroned and building the eschatological temple.
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  • 3
    Language: English
    Year of publication: 2022
    Titel der Quelle: Journal of Biblical Literature
    Angaben zur Quelle: 141,3 (2022) 553-574
    Keywords: David, In the New Testament ; Moses In the New Testament ; New Testament. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc. ; Bible. Criticism, interpretation, etc.
    Abstract: The meaning of the enigmatic verse of Acts 15:21, not to mention the issues around the preceding Apostolic Decree (vv. 19–20), has largely been researched individually and historical-critically. By contrast, in this study I explicate the meaning of the verse within the broader scope of James’s speech by attending to the Jewish spatiality on Luke’s narrative-ideological plane. The Lukan James’s speech tightly combines intertextual elements that bear on significant Jewish spatiality, namely, the restored tent of David (v. 16) within the quotation of Amos 9:11–12, the alluded-to holy land (v. 20) drawn from Lev 17–18 as the background of the decree, and the Jewish synagogues in every city (v. 21) as the background of James’s final invocation of Moses. From this perspective, I propose that v. 21 is part of the Lukan narrative-ideological portrait that reconfigures the holy land’s purity concern via the eschatological presence of the restored Davidic tent, making it relevant to the larger Greco-Roman world in accordance with the continuing monotheistic cultic sanctity.
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